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OSU-Tulsa News

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Receptions set for Graduate Education Week

Thomas Wallis, an OSU-Tulsa graduate admissions officer, arranges fliers in the new Graduate Student Services Center in North Hall 130.
Thomas Wallis, an OSU-Tulsa graduate admissions officer, arranges promotional materials in the new Graduate Student Services Center in North Hall 130.

OSU-Tulsa Graduate Student Services Center will host afternoon receptions for Graduate Education Week April 13-16 in the center’s new location in North Hall 130.

In appreciation of current graduate students, daily receptions will be from 3:30-4:30p.m. with free refreshments and tours of the newly remodeled North Hall 130, which houses Graduate Student Services Center, Prospective Student Services, Undergraduate Advising, Campus Life, Scholarships and Financial Aid and Career Services. In addition, students who are interested in graduate school may learn about programs available at OSU-Tulsa.

The receptions are being hosted in conjunction with Graduate Education Week at OSU-Stillwater. For more information, visit the OSU-Tulsa Graduate Student Services website.

Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers to present spring concert

Rutland
Rutland

Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers at OSU-Tulsa will present a spring concert, “Sing Me Back Home Oklahoma,” at 7 p.m. on April 17 at Guthrie Green.

Local musical artists Janet Rutland, Shelby Eicher, Miles Ralston and Scott McQuade will sing classic hits by Oklahoma songwriters, including legendary Woody Guthrie. The event is free and open to the public.

The event is the finale to the “Oklahoma Writers – A Literary Tableau” exhibit, a seven-week event showcasing Oklahoma’s rich literary tradition with exhibits at several venues. For more information about the concert or the exhibit, visit the Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers website.

Seminar to examine the need for public engineering

Briant
Briant

Clyde Briant, professor of engineering and Otis E. Randall University Professor at Brown University, will discuss the need for public engineering at the Materials Science and Engineering Seminar at 2 p.m. on April 23 in Helmerich Research Center 153.

Public engineering is an expanded approach to training that incorporates components of humanities and social sciences in addition to science and technology education. This type of education will enable engineers to better address issues of policy, ethics and the broad impact technology has on society.

Briant's research interests center on mechanical properties of materials and how these properties can be explained by various microstructural elements. More recently he has examined issues in engineering and science studies and engineering education. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of ASM International, the largest association of metals-centric materials scientists and engineers in the world.

The seminar, presented by the OSU School of Materials Science and Engineering, is free and open to the public.

Riverfield Country Day School pre-K students tour campus

OSU-Tulsa Police Officer David Pillars leads pre-kindergarten students from Riverfield Country Day School on a tour of a police vehicle last Thursday.
OSU-Tulsa Police Officer David Pillars shows pre-kindergarten students from Riverfield Country Day School a police vehicle last Thursday.

A group of pre-kindergarten students from Riverfield Country Day School spent last Thursday morning at OSU-Tulsa to learn about higher education, fitness and safety. 

OSU-Tulsa Police Chief Melvin Murdock gave a presentation on how police officers work to keep them safe and Officer David Pillars showed an OSU-Tulsa Police cruiser.

The students also experienced a mini-lecture from the fieldtrip organizer, Dr. Tim Hart, exercised at the Wellness Center’s Fitness Studio with personal trainers Danielle Brown and Darnell Dinkins, enjoyed freshly baked sugar cookies from Subway and went home with OSU-themed goodie bags.

Cowboy Aphasia Camp offers treatment to people with language disorder

Several participants at the 2014 Cowboy Aphasia Camp receive therapy with guidance from OSU-Tulsa graduate student clinicians.
Several participants at the 2014 Cowboy Aphasia Camp receive guidance from OSU-Tulsa graduate student clinicians.

OSU-Tulsa will host the annual Cowboy Aphasia Camp this summer to offer people with the language disorder an opportunity to improve communication skills and provide graduate student clinicians with professional-level experience.

Aphasia affects the ability to use and understand words after a stroke, brain tumor or other head injury.

The camp will be June 1-5 at the OSU-Tulsa campus. Graduate student clinicians in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Program will provide one-on-one therapy for people with aphasia. Activities include pet therapy visits, facilitated painting, music for language experiences, computer-based language therapy and more.

To read the full story about the Cowboy Aphasia Camp, visit the OSU-Tulsa website.

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